Let’s Talk About Single Life: Save the date, November 13 2016, in Los Angeles


I’ll be talking about single people and single life in Los Angeles on November 13, 2016, from 3—6 p.m. It should be a lively conversation and I hope you can join us.

Thanks to Kim Calvert, creator and editor of Singular Magazine and the SingularCity social networking community, for hosting this event. (That’s her in the picture at the top of this post, welcoming us to Singular City.) Here is what she posted about the event:


HOW WE LIVE NOW Shortlisted for Community-Wide Reading Program

COVER, How We Live Now

Do you know about those programs in which an entire community or campus or freshman class is encouraged to all read the same book? I just learned that How We Live Now has been shortlisted for one of those programs in Michigan. I haven’t been told which one. I also don’t know how long the shortlist is, so I don’t know what my chances actually are like. I should find out if anything comes of this by around the end of Nov.


Single-Minded Change Agents: Slaying Singlism, Mocking Matrimania, and Creating a Better World for Single People

social justice words

I’ve been on a decades-long mission to push back against all the misrepresentations of single people as sad and lonely losers, and to showcase more accurate portrayals of how real single people often live meaningful and fulfilling lives. As part of my quest to slay singlism and bring matrimania to its knees, I have been sharing the stories of single-minded change agents who are inspired by the same passions. They have already made great strides in challenging marital status discrimination and highlighting stories of the good single life.


Where Could a Rabbit Run? What John Updike Shows About Marriage

Jaclyn Geller

Guest Post by Jaclyn Geller

[Bella’s intro: If you are interested in marriage and its discontents, especially as represented in beautifully written literary novels, then you are probably a fan of John Updike. Volumes have been written about Updike, but I’m betting you have never seen anything quite like the essay about Rabbit, Run written by the brilliant Professor of English, Jaclyn Geller. She believes that Updike offered not just a critique of marriage, but of an entire ideology of marriage dominant in the 1950s. The protagonist of the Rabbit series, Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, wants to run from marriage, but finds nowhere to run to.